What invoice statuses can be viewed on MyInvoice?

View the list of supported agencies to determine which Agencies' invoice status can be viewed using MyInvoice.

There are certain invoices shown as ‘Status Available on MyInvoice which cannot be viewed via MyInvoice.

For example:

  • Building maintenance and facilities management invoices for the Department for Planning, Transport and Infrastructure
  • Property maintenance, council and water rates invoices for the South Australian Housing Trust
  • Workcover and workers compensation invoices for all Government Agencies.

The status of Credit Notes cannot be viewed via MyInvoice.

If you require further assistance, please contact Accounts Payable.

Why can't I see my invoice(s) in the search results?

Reasons the status of your invoice cannot be viewed on the MyInvoice search function include:

  • You may have sent the invoice to a Government Agency directly in the first instance and they have not forwarded the invoice to Shared Services SA for processing yet
  • Your invoice relates to goods and services provided to a Government Agency (as defined in the list of supported agencies) that cannot be viewed via the MyInvoice search function
  • Your invoice may not have been scanned into the electronic procurement system as yet. Allow 5 business days from sending your invoice for this to occur.

Who do I contact if the status of my invoice is not available via this website?

Please contact Shared Services SA for Government Agencies identified as ‘Invoice Enquiries to Shared Services SA' in the list of supported agencies. Contact Accounts Payable.

Please contact the Government Agency directly if shown as ‘Invoice Enquiries to Agency' or if the Government Agency is not shown on the list of supported agencies.

Contact details for each of these Government Agencies are available at sa.gov.au

What if my invoice is older than 90 days?

MyInvoice search functionality will return all invoices in progress and any invoice paid within the last 90 days. For further details on invoices paid more the 90 days ago please contact Accounts Payable.

Where can I find more information about the end to end process for invoice payment?

Please refer to the Invoice Payment Lifecycle.

What if I don't have an ABN?

To view the status of your invoice via the MyInvoice search function you need to have an ABN. If you don't have an ABN, you can make an invoice enquiry directly with Shared Services SA for Government Agencies shown as ‘Invoice Enquiries to Shared Services SA' on the list of supported agencies via phone or email. Please contact Accounts Payable.

Have you received my invoice?

To confirm if Shared Services SA has received your invoice for payment, you can view the status of your invoice via the MyInvoice search function.

Alternatively, you can make an invoice enquiry directly with Shared Services SA via phone or email. Please contact Accounts Payable.

When will my invoice be paid?

The SA Government aims to pay all invoices within 30 calendar days of the date the invoice is received.

To obtain an estimate of the business days until payment, please refer to the MyInvoice search function.

Alternatively, you can make an invoice enquiry directly with Shared Services SA via phone or email. Please contact Accounts Payable.

Where can I send my invoice?

Please refer to How to Streamline Payment.

How do I remove my information from MyInvoice (Unsubscribe)

To remove the invoice payment details relating to your business ABN from the MyInvoice search results, please unsubscribe.

Will my invoice payment be reportable to the ATO at the end of financial year under Taxable Payments Annual Report (Third Party Reporting Payments)?

From 1 July 2017, government entities are required to report on total payments made wholly or partly to businesses for providing services and total grants paid to people or organisations that have an ABN. The payment of this invoice may be reportable as part of Taxable Payments Annual Report, as per legislative requirement of ATO.

For more information about your obligations, please contact your agency and/or refer to information on the ATO website.

Late Payment of Government Debts (Interest) Act 2013

The Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) listed below are intended as a guide to assist public authorities and businesses in interpreting the Late Payment of Government Debts (Interest) Act 2013, as amended effective 1 November 2018 to include the automatic payment of interest on overdue invoices. The materials on this website regarding the Act and associated Regulations are for information purposes only. Before relying on this information, you should independently confirm its accuracy, currency and completeness.

What is covered by the Late Payment of Government Debts (Interest) Act 2013?

The Act was amended effective 1 November 2018 (via the Late Payment of Government Debts (Interest) (Automatic Payment of Interest) Bill 2018) to require that interest is applied to any undisputed invoice meeting certain criteria, not paid within 30 calendar days of the date it is received by a public authority.

The Act requires that the payment of interest on an overdue invoice occur within 48 hours of when the original invoice is paid, where the following criteria are met:

  • The invoice is valued at $1 million (GST exclusive) or less; and
  • The amount of interest to be paid is $10 or more; and
  • The invoice was issued by a business which is incorporated under the Corporations Act 2001 (Cwth) or by an individual whose principal place of residence is situated in Australia; and
  • The invoice relates to the provision of goods and/or services to a public authority; and
  • The invoice is correctly rendered (e.g. GST compliant, appropriately addressed, etc.) and not disputed.

The scope of the Act has also been expanded to cover all businesses trading with the SA Government, rather than the previous limitation to small business.

Businesses do not need to submit a separate invoice or any other supporting documentation to receive late payment interest – this process will occur automatically.

Invoices issued under certain types of contractual arrangements with Public Authorities are not eligible for interest payments. For further details regarding these exclusions please refer to: What is not covered by the Late Payment of Government Debts (Interest) Act 2013?

What is the start date of the Act?

The Act applies to invoices with an Agency Received Date on or after 1 November 2018. In practice this means that no interest will be calculated and paid until at least 30 calendar days after that (i.e. on 1st December 2018 or later).

Which Government Agencies are covered by the Act?

The Act applies to public authorities (e.g. Government agencies, public corporations, various statutory bodies) listed in a Gazette published by the Treasurer.

What is not covered by the Late Payment of Government Debts (Interest) Act 2013?

Examples of businesses which are not entitled to receive late payment interest include:

  • Other State Government Public Authorities;
  • Public schools
  • Public universities
  • Local Government, Commonwealth Government, or public entities in other State Government jurisdiction;
  • Public sector employees
  • Members of the public (unless they are directly providing goods or services to a public authority).

Examples of types of invoices which will not have late payment interest applied include:

  • Invoices in a foreign currency;
  • Invoices that do not relate to the supply of goods or services; and
  • Where the invoice/payment is a refund.

The Act also excludes invoices submitted under the following types of contracts from the application of late payment interest:

  • Makes specific provision for payment terms that are greater than 30 days; or
  • Makes specific provision for the payment of interest if a payment is not made in accordance with the terms of the contract; or
  • Is covered under the Building and Construction Industry Security of Payment Act 2009.

How long will it take to receive late payment interest?

If penalty interest is payable, it will be paid by the public authority within 48 hours of the overdue invoice being paid. For a majority of public authorities, the interest will be paid at the same time as the overdue invoice is paid.

Will GST be included when calculating late payment interest?

GST will not be included when calculating penalty interest. In other words, interest will be calculated on GST exclusive value of the invoice.

Will GST be applied to the late payment interest amount?

GST will not be applied to penalty interest payments. Penalty interest payments are an input taxed supply under section 40-5 of A New Tax System (Goods and Services Tax) Act 1999. Therefore, late payment interest is not subject to GST and there is no entitlement to an input tax credit for the things that are acquired to make the financial supply.

What is the definition of a correctly rendered invoice?

An invoice needs to be correctly rendered to ensure that it can be processed in a timely manner by the applicable public authority.

An invoice will be considered to correctly rendered if:

  • It is GST compliant; and
  • The invoice reflects the correct price for the goods / services delivered; and
  • The invoice reflects the correct quantity of the goods / services delivered; and
  • The invoice contains the relevant Purchase Order or Contract Reference number (if applicable); and
  • The invoice is correctly addressed.

A public authority may dispute an invoice if it not correctly rendered. In such cases, the business would not be entitled to late payment interest if the associated invoice is paid late.

How should invoices be correctly addressed?

Invoices should quote (as part of the "bill to" address block) the public authority name (mandatory), the actual division/business unit in the public authority the supply relates to and the name of the contact person at the public authority.

Format

Trading Entity

Site Name and Business Unit

 

GPO Box 11027

Adelaide SA 5001

 

Purchase Order Number/Contract

Reference

Example

Northern Adelaide Local Health Network

Modbury Hospital - Radiology

Attention: Bill Smith

GPO Box 11027

Adelaide SA 5001

 

PO #658934

How will a business know if penalty interest has been paid?

The Remittance Advice will show the interest paid as a separate line item (in most cases).

What is the Agency Received Date?

The Agency Received Date is the date the invoice was physically received by the applicable public authority or Shared Services SA.

This date and not the Invoice Date will be used to calculate any late payment interest entitlement.

What is the Payment Date?

The payment date is:

  • For an EFT, the date that the public authority sends the payment file to the bank; and
  • For a cheque, the date the cheque was posted.

How is late payment interest calculated?

The late payment interest amount must be calculated with the following formula: I = ND x (IA x PIR) / 365
Where:

  • I is the interest payable to the business
  • ND is equal to the number of days that the invoice is paid late (i.e. interest starts to apply from the 31st day after the Agency Invoice Received Date)
  • IA is the value of the invoice (GST exclusive)
  • PIR is the prescribed interest rate applying on the first day of the month in which the default period ends. The prescribed interest rate is the Reserve Bank Cash Rate for the applicable month plus 5%.

Businesses can calculate the late payment interest they may be entitled to, using the MyInvoice Calculator.

Example for payments received by cheque

An example of how interest will be calculated using this formula for a cheque payment is as follows:

  • Invoice amount: $220,000 (GST inclusive)
  • Agency received date: 6 June 2018
  • Invoice due date: 6 July 2018 (30 calendar days after the Agency Received Date)
  • Payment Date: 25 July 2018
  • Default Period: 19 calendar days plus 2 days for the cheque to be printed and posted = 21 days
  • RBA Cash Rate: 1.5% (as at 1 July 2018)
  • I = 21 x ($200,000 X (1.5% + 5%)) / 365

Interest payable = $747.95 (rounded to the nearest whole cent)

Example for payments received by electronic funds transfer

  • Invoice amount: $220,000 (GST inclusive)
  • Agency received date: 6 June 2018
  • Invoice due date: 6 July 2018 (30 calendar days after the Agency Received Date)
  • Payment Date: 25 July 2018
  • Calculation Period: 19 calendar days
  • RBA Cash Rate: 1.5% (as at 1 July 2018)
  • I = 19 x ($200,000 X (1.5% + 5%)) / 365

Interest payable = $676.71 (rounded to the nearest whole cent)

How and when can an invoice be disputed by a public authority?

An invoice may be disputed when it is not correctly rendered. Refer to the question: What is the definition of a correctly rendered invoice? for further details.

In cases where an invoice is disputed, details of any communication with the supplier and the reason for the dispute should be documented and retained for reporting purposes.

For those Public Authorities utilising Basware, the system already provides a facility to designate that a particular invoice is in dispute and record/attach supporting documentation.

Other public authorities will need to establish their own internal processes to keep appropriate records regarding any disputed invoices for future reference.

When the dispute has been resolved and the invoice is ready to be paid, it is likely that either the invoice date or the invoice received at agency date will need to be modified (in the applicable finance system) to reflect the resolution of the dispute and to ensure the correct interest (if any) is calculated and paid. For invoices processed via Basware, the system automatically updates the received at agency date to the approved date, once a disputed invoice is approved for payment.

During the period where an invoice is in dispute, late payment interest will not be calculated or paid to businesses.

If a late payment interest is paid by mistake, should the payment be recovered?

In accordance with Treasurer's Instructions, any money (including late payment interest) incorrectly paid to a third party should be recovered.

Liability for Late Payment Interest – what if it is Shared Service SA's fault?

Shared Services SA endeavours to process every transactions correctly and meet agreed service levels. Whilst the processes and systems that have been established should minimise instances where our action/inaction results in a public authority paying interest on an overdue invoice, it is recognised that we will make mistakes and errors from time to time.

In accordance with the Service Level Determinations established with each in-scope public authority, Shared Services SA is not financially liable for any errors made in the delivery of its services to public authorities.

How are Injury Management Claim Invoices treated?

Invoices relating to Injury Management Claims are managed and submitted via SIMS (Self Insurance Management System).

These invoices are entered with an invoice date and a date received at the agency. Any applicable late payment of interest will accrue from the date received at the agency.

Injury Management Units should ensure the following operational process is followed when entering invoices on SIMS:

  • For all invoices received prior to the acceptance of liability, then the SIMS 'Date Received' date needs to reflect the date of the acceptance of liability (i.e. date of claim acceptance, date the SAET sealed orders were received, etc.);
  • For all invoices received after the acceptance of liability, then the SIMS 'Date Received' date needs to reflect the date the invoice was received by the relevant Injury Management Unit.

Can I use a Purchase Card to Pay a Late Invoice?

Purchase cards should not be used to pay overdue invoices.

Purchase cards should only be used to make payments for goods and services immediately at the point they are received (or shortly thereafter). Therefore, it is assumed that there will not be any instances where late payment interest needs to be calculated for an invoice paid via purchase card. As a result no changes to existing purchase card payment processes or systems have been contemplated at this time.

How are Pre-Payments Treated?

Treasurer's Instruction 11 allows for certain circumstances where payment in advance is allowed for goods and services not yet rendered. Where an invoice relating to a prepayment is received and processed by the public authority for payment, the Invoice Received at Agency date will be used to calculate any late payment interest due (i.e. the same process as for an invoice received after the applicable goods and services are delivered).

Generally payments in advance for goods that have not been received or for services not yet rendered may only be made where it is required in the ordinary course of business to make such payments; i.e. insurance, leases where the agreement states that payments must be made monthly in advance, motor vehicle registrations, subscriptions, telephone rental, water rates and similar would be considered to be in the ordinary course of business. Please refer to Treasurer's Instruction 11 for more information.

Treasury Instruction 8 and Late Payment Interest

Treasurer's Instruction 8 has been amended to enable interest to be paid without requirement for approval by a public authority financial delegate.

Treasury Instruction 11 Performance Reporting and Late Payments

New accounts payment performance reporting requirements have been in place since 1 June 2018, following amendment of Treasurer's Instruction 11. In summary, Sections 11.14A of TI11 requires public authorities to submit reports to DTF and their applicable Minister (within 21 days of the end of each month) detailing:

Account payment performance and late payment interest information must be lodged through the Budget Monitoring System (BMS). The drop-down box in BMS will enable you to select the month you are entering data for.

Agencies that fail to lodge their report by the due date will be in breach of TI 11.

Treasury Instruction 12 and Late Payments

There are no changes to Treasury Instruction 12 in relation to Late Payment Interest.

What happens if an invoice is not correctly rendered (e.g. incorrectly addressed, missing a Purchase Order number, etc.)?

Businesses are required to r correctly render invoices for payment. See answer to: What is the definition of a correctly rendered invoice? for further details.

If the invoice is not rendered correctly then it can be considered to be in dispute.

Whilst the invoice is in dispute, payment cannot be made.

No late payment liability will be incurred during the time an invoice is in dispute (providing the reason for the dispute is consistent with the requirements of the Act and/or Treasurer's Instruction 11.

What happens if there is a dispute as to whether late payment interest should or should not be paid against a particular invoice?

A business may lodge a dispute with a public authority regarding a number of matters such as: the amount of interest paid, the length of time an invoice was with the public authority before payment (i.e. the Agency Received Date) or why a particular invoice was disputed.

In the event that there is a disagreement between a business and a public authority over the matter of late payment interest, the business should seek to resolve the matter with the public authority in the first instance. Where, Shared Services SA provides an accounts payable service to a public authority, disputes can be lodged with Shared Services SA in the first instance.

Should a business not be satisfied with the response provided, it may escalate the dispute to the Chief Executive of the applicable public authority. Should the business still not be satisfied, the matter can be referred to the Small Business Commissioner. Under the Act, the Small Business Commissioner has the authority to make determinations as to whether interest should be paid to a business, based on the particular circumstances of each case.

Section 7 of the Act allows for the Small Business Commissioner to specify procedures and requirements to resolve disputes which may arise between a public authority and a business.

  • For all invoices received prior to the acceptance of liability, then the SIMS 'Date Received' date needs to reflect the date of the acceptance of liability (i.e. date of claim acceptance, date the SAET sealed orders were received, etc.);
  • For all invoices received after the acceptance of liability, then the SIMS ‘Date Received’ date needs to reflect the date the invoice was received by the relevant Injury Management Unit.
  • For all invoices received prior to the acceptance of liability, then the SIMS ‘Date Received' date needs to reflect the date of the acceptance of liability (i.e. date of claim acceptance, date the SAET sealed orders were received, etc.);
  • For all invoices received after the acceptance of liability, then the SIMS ‘Date Received' date needs to reflect the date the invoice was received by the relevant Injury Management Unit.
  • The volume and value of invoices paid for the preceding month within the following time bands; 1 to 30 days, 30 to 60 days and greater than 60 days (from the invoice received date);
  • An analysis/explanation of the performance outcomes, particularly where invoices have not been paid within 30 days; and
  • For those public authorities subject to the Act, details of the total amount of interest paid and the number of invoices on which this interest was paid.